Understanding Global   
Development Challenges

Policy papers

Women's economic capacity and children's human capital accumulation

J. de Hoop, P. Premand, F. Rosati, R. Vakis
Programs that increase the economic capacity of women from poor rural backgrounds are multiplying around the world. These programs can have cascading effects on children's participation in school and work that are theoretically undetermined. We present a simple model to describe the potential channels through which the promotion of women's productive capacity may affect children's participation in school and work. Based on a cluster-randomized trial, we examine how a productive intervention targeted at poor rural women in Nicaragua affected children. While the intervention did not aim to address school attendance and child labour, we find that children in beneficiary households are more likely to attend school and less likely to only be working one year after the end of the intervention. An increase in women's influence on household decisions appears to be the primary channel for the program's beneficial effect on school attendance.

Pathways from school to work in the developing world

M. Manacorda, M. Ranzani, F.C. Rosati, G. Dachille
Moving from education into the world of work is a crucial phase in youth lives. There is ample evidence that initial difficulties in this process might have long lasting consequences. The scarcity of information about middle and low income countries has especially hampered research in this area. This paper contributes to fill this gap by analysing the School to Work Transition Surveys carried out by the ILO in 28 low and middle income countries in 2012 and 2013.

"Moving upstream the “relevant” migration frontier. Strategic priorities to turn the migration challenge into a development opportunity"

Laura Frigenti* and Furio C. Rosati**

Migration is one of the most pressing issues on the international political agenda. Despite its current immediate emergency, however, migration is the result of long-term factors and very likely to last for many decades ahead. This calls for a new and more integrated approach to international migration, deeply rooted in sound empirical evidence of the complex dynamics driving people global mobility and emphasizing the key role of countries of origin as the centre of gravity of current and future migration policies and interventions to turn the migration challenge into a development opportunity for both origin and destination economies.

What's new

Report

"Towards sustainable migration. Interventions in countries of origin"